Recent Articles https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss Recent Articles for Our Voices - Women in STEM en This Scientist Was the Architect of #MeTooSTEM. Now Others Are Fighting to Save Her Job. https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/news/scientist-was-architect-metoostem-now-others-are-fighting-save-her-job <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">This Scientist Was the Architect of #MeTooSTEM. Now Others Are Fighting to Save Her Job.</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">March 04, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/metoostem.jpg?h=c9c76477&amp;itok=jJwGSRUp" width="1280" height="720" alt="#MeTooSTEM" title="Lane Turner, The Boston Globe, Getty Images" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="Posted by Women in STEM Editorial Board Over the past two weeks, scientists nationwide have rallied behind a Vanderbilt University professor and prominent anti-harassment activist who is fighting to reverse her tenure denial. BethAnn McLaughlin, an assistant professor of neurology and pharmacology at Vanderbilt&#039;s medical center, has become widely known over the past nine months as the architect of #MeTooSTEM, which began as a website and social-media community where people could tell their stories of experiencing harassment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. It&#039;s now a nonprofit organization. But as McLaughlin was battling misconduct in science, she was embroiled in a battle on her own campus. Her tenure case at Vanderbilt has stretched on for more than four years. For 17 months, the process was frozen as her social-media activity was investigated. That review, she said, had its roots in retaliation. A colleague had filed a false complaint against her, she said, after she served as a witness in an investigation into his alleged misconduct. To read the full article by Sarah Brown, visit The Chronicle. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Posted by Women in STEM Editorial Board Over the past two weeks, scientists nationwide have rallied behind a Vanderbilt University professor and prominent anti-harassment activist who is fighting to reverse her tenure denial." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Posted by Women in STEM Editorial Board</p> <p>Over the past two weeks, scientists nationwide have rallied behind a Vanderbilt University professor and prominent anti-harassment activist who is fighting to reverse her tenure denial.</p> <p>BethAnn McLaughlin, an assistant professor of neurology and pharmacology at Vanderbilt's medical center, has become widely known over the past nine months as the architect of <a href="https://metoostem.com/">#MeTooSTEM,</a> which began as a website and social-media community where people could tell their stories of experiencing harassment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. It's now a nonprofit organization.</p> <p>But as McLaughlin was battling misconduct in science, she was embroiled in a battle on her own campus. Her tenure case at Vanderbilt has stretched on for more than four years. For 17 months, the process was frozen as her social-media activity was investigated. That review, she said, had its roots in retaliation. A colleague had filed a false complaint against her, she said, after she served as a witness in an investigation into his alleged misconduct.</p> <p>To read the full article by Sarah Brown, visit <a href="https://www.chronicle.com/article/This-Scientist-Was-the/245806">The Chronicle.</a></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/women-stem" hreflang="en">Women in STEM</a></div> </div> Mon, 04 Mar 2019 19:51:33 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 641 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu A Brief Guide to Successful Negotiation in Academia https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/blog/brief-guide-successful-negotiation-academia <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A Brief Guide to Successful Negotiation in Academia</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">March 04, 2019</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Negotiation-Fotolia_50210262_XS.jpg?h=42b6a032&amp;itok=fLJo-aLR" width="1280" height="720" alt="Negotiation" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="The process of negotiation can be challenging for many especially in academia. When people seek my advice for putting a start-up package together they generally start by saying they do not want to appear too greedy.  (1) Forget greed, it is all about need. Negotiating for a start-up package is about asking for what is essential in order for you to be successful at what you are being hired to do.  Ask for the maximum of what you need.  It is not about trying to game a system to get the maximum you can or figuring out the maximum you can ask for and not appear greedy. You want the negotiation to focus on how your needs can be met not whether or not you actually need the times on your list.  Always think “need”.  (2)  You are negotiating for your team.  Often people will tell me that they are uncomfortable asking for so much for themselves. In reality start-up package negotiation is about establishing a successful research or creative activity program which means building a team.  So think “team”.  (3) Do your homework. I am often surprised that people will show me their list for a start-up package but when I ask them what they actually need they have not really thought about it. Start-up packages are not generic. They need to be targeted to what you actually need to have access to. It is important to keep track of things you use or take for granted every day and make a list. From that list you can create a list of needs. Some needs may be required for the lab, some may be satisfied by institutional shared equipment or services, but the list should be complete. Remember, this is a negotiation and part of the negotiating process is determining if your needs mandate purchasing analytical equipment or having access to it. It is also important to have determined need so that if asked you can easily and readily justify the need. Be prepared. (4) Seek advice early. I never like it when someone tells me that they need my help on a start-up package because they have to send it in the next day. These kinds of rush jobs are never fully professionally done. When you decide upon a career path, whether it be academic or corporate start forming a network of advisors – peers also seeking positions, recently hired faculty and senior mentors with experience in hiring and negotiation. Use these resources to think about your needs before you visit any institution for an interview. This will give you an idea of the match between your needs and institutional capabilities. Be informed.  Finally  (5) Don’t sweat the details. Do not obsess over the cost of items, an approximation is fine. Focusing too much on cost is bad for the psyche – it reinforces a connection of negotiation with greed rather than need.  Focus on need. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "The process of negotiation can be challenging for many especially in academia. When people seek my advice for putting a start-up package together they generally start by saying they do not want to appear too greedy.  (1) Forget greed, it is all about need. Negotiating for a start-up package is about asking for what is essential in order for you to be successful at what you are being hired to do." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span>The process of negotiation can be challenging for many especially in academia. When people seek my advice for putting a start-up package together they generally start by saying they do not want to appear too greedy.  (1) <strong>Forget greed, it is all about need</strong>. Negotiating for a start-up package is about asking for what is essential in order for you to be successful at what you are being hired to do.  Ask for the maximum of what you need.  It is not about trying to game a system to get the maximum you can or figuring out the maximum you can ask for and not appear greedy. You want the negotiation to focus on how your needs can be met not whether or not you actually need the times on your list.  Always think “need”.  (2)  <strong>You are negotiating for your team.  </strong>Often people will tell me that they are uncomfortable asking for so much for themselves. In reality start-up package negotiation is about establishing a successful research or creative activity program which means building a team.  So think “team”.  (3) <strong>Do your homework.</strong> I am often surprised that people will show me their list for a start-up package but when I ask them what they actually need they have not really thought about it. Start-up packages are not generic. They need to be targeted to what you actually need to have access to. It is important to keep track of things you use or take for granted every day and make a list. From that list you can create a list of needs. Some needs may be required for the lab, some may be satisfied by institutional shared equipment or services, but the list should be complete. Remember, this is a negotiation and part of the negotiating process is determining if your needs mandate purchasing analytical equipment or having access to it. It is also important to have determined need so that if asked you can easily and readily justify the need. Be prepared. (4) <strong>Seek advice early</strong>. I never like it when someone tells me that they need my help on a start-up package because they have to send it in the next day. These kinds of rush jobs are never fully professionally done. When you decide upon a career path, whether it be academic or corporate start forming a network of advisors – peers also seeking positions, recently hired faculty and senior mentors with experience in hiring and negotiation. Use these resources to think about your needs before you visit any institution for an interview. This will give you an idea of the match between your needs and institutional capabilities. Be informed.  Finally  (5) <strong>Don’t sweat the details</strong>. Do not obsess over the cost of items, an approximation is fine. Focusing too much on cost is bad for the psyche – it reinforces a connection of negotiation with greed rather than need.  Focus on need. </span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/human-animal-health" hreflang="en">Hiring Practices</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/negotiations" hreflang="en">Negotiations</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/academia" hreflang="en">academia</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/salary" hreflang="en">Salary</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/blog" hreflang="en">Blog</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/guide" hreflang="en">Guide</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 04 Mar 2019 17:38:23 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 626 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu #MeToo Immunity - "Time's Up" for Politics? https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/blog/metoo-immunity-times-politics <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">#MeToo Immunity - &quot;Time&#039;s Up&quot; for Politics?</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/MeToo.png?h=63549705&amp;itok=NueU4cBM" width="1280" height="720" alt="MeToo" title="Photo Credit: StockPhoto" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="It has been almost 100 years since women were granted the right to vote, and politics is still a place full of obstacles for women.  “MeToo” has grown since 2006 and gained more traction and publicity over the last couple years to unite women towards a common goal that transcends race, ethnicity, religion, socio-economic status, education, and political affiliation to “support survivors and end sexual violence.” This movement has become a force for social change with outstanding results across many industries, but has it hit a brick wall when it comes to politics? Time&#039;s Up/Blue Seat StudiosIt has long been an open secret in many industries that people in positions of power have preyed on those in lower positions. According to Vox.com, 252 celebrities, politicians, CEOs, and others have been accused of sexual misconduct since April 2017. 74% of Americans that believe sexual assault or domestic abuse allegations should prevent a person from being in a position of power. Kevin Spacey, Harvey Weinstein, Russel Simmons, Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, and Travis Kalanick, are examples of accused men in entertainment and business being held accountable by not only being removed from their positions but prevented from returning.  While some accused politicians have resigned or refrained from seeking reelection, Roy Moore, Donald Trump, Clay Johnson, and many others seem to suffer no repercussions for the allegations made against them. In fact, they were continuously employed, endorsed, and elected even after public allegations were made. At what point do party politics and legislative records bow to the disqualifying moral depravity of sexual misconduct? Many men in Hollywood were celebrated for gracing the red carpet sporting all black and Time’s Up pins in support of this mission to clean-up their industry and ensure that Hollywood is used an example of a zero-tolerance policy and demanding safe work environments for all.  Perhaps elected officials wearing Time’s Up pins in the senate chamber would help make a difference. Despite, or maybe because, of the seeming indifference towards sexual misconduct in politics, a record number of women are running for office in the upcoming elections. A growing sentiment of female empowerment to speak up and take action is a huge win for women. Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s SCOTUS confirmation brought “Me Too” front and center of the political arena like never before.  This movement, once seen as a non-political unifying force to bring voice to previously silent victims, is increasingly becoming a divisive and political issue. Has the momentum of the movement hit a stunning halt in the political sector? Now that the confirmation has concluded, what types of changes will we see from the bench? Will this SCOTUS appointment serve as a catalyst for further social change driven by the unifying goal of the “Me Too” and “Time’s Up” movements? "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "#MeToo and Time&#039;s Up movements as agents of change in many industries and the challenges they face in politics. By: Kate Blumenthal " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span>It has been almost 100 years since women were granted the right to vote, and politics is still a place full of obstacles for women.  “<span><span><a href="https://metoomvmt.org/">MeToo</a>”</span></span> has grown since 2006 and gained more traction and publicity over the last couple years to unite women towards a common goal that transcends race, ethnicity, religion, socio-economic status, education, and political affiliation to “support survivors and end sexual violence.” This movement has become a force for social change with outstanding results across many industries, but has it hit a brick wall when it comes to politics? </span></span></span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="psa" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="b7545afa-f5a0-4128-bc9c-482a37e2ec5d" height="148" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/inline-images/anti-harassment-psa-CONTENT-2018.jpg" width="264" /><figcaption>Time's Up/Blue Seat Studios</figcaption></figure><p><span><span><span>It has long been an open secret in many industries that people in positions of power have preyed on those in lower </span></span></span><span><span><span>positions. According to Vox.com, <span><span><a href="https://www.vox.com/a/sexual-harassment-assault-allegations-list">252 celebrities, politicians, CEOs, and others</a></span></span> have been accused of sexual misconduct since April 2017. <span><span><a href="https://medium.com/@stefan_30846/the-political-impact-of-metoo-e5c9ff20a779">74% of Americans</a></span></span> that believe sexual assault or domestic abuse allegations should prevent a person from being in a position of power.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Kevin Spacey, <span><span><span><span>Harvey Weinstein</span></span></span></span>, Russel Simmons, <span><span><span><span>Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, and Travis K</span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span>alanick,</span></span></span></span> are examples of accused men in entertainment and business being held accountable by not only being removed from their positions but prevented from returning.  While some accused politicians have resigned or refrained from seeking reelection, Roy Moore, Donald Trump, <span><span><span><span>Clay Johnson</span></span></span></span>, and many others seem to suffer no repercussions for the allegations made against them. In fact, they were continuously employed, endorsed, and elected even after public allegations were made. At what point do party politics and legislative </span></span></span><span><span><span>records bow to the disqualifying moral depravity of sexual misconduct? </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Many men in Hollywood were celebrated for gracing the red carpet sporting all black and </span></span></span><img alt="times up" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="c4aca8c1-387a-4e33-b0e1-03d2915b347f" height="170" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/inline-images/times%20up.jpg" width="339" class="align-left" /><span><span><span>Time’s Up pins in support of this mission to clean-up their industry and ensure that Hollywood is used an example of a zero-tolerance policy and demanding safe work environments for all.  Perhaps elected officials wearing Time’s Up pins in the senate chamber would help make a difference. Despite, or maybe because, of the seeming indifference towards sexual misconduct in politics, a <span><span><a href="https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/sep/17/record-number-of-women-running-for-office-in-2018-/">record number of women are running for office</a></span></span> in the upcoming elections. A growing sentiment of female empowerment to speak up and take action is a huge win for women.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s SCOTUS confirmation brought “Me Too” front and center of the political arena like never before.  This movement, once seen as a non-political unifying force to bring voice to previously silent victims, is increasingly becoming a divisive and political issue. Has the momentum of the movement hit a stunning halt in the political sector? Now that the confirmation has concluded, what types of changes will we see from the bench? Will this SCOTUS appointment serve as a catalyst for further social change driven by the unifying goal of the “Me Too” and “Time’s Up” movements? </span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/society-arts-culture" hreflang="en">Society, Arts &amp; Culture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/metoo" hreflang="en">#MeToo</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/times" hreflang="en">Time&#039;s Up</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sexual-assault" hreflang="en">Sexual Assault</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/scotus" hreflang="en">SCOTUS</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/kavanaugh" hreflang="en">Kavanaugh</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 08:55:29 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 621 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu As More Women Run for Office, U.S. State Legislatures are Poised to Change https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/news/more-women-run-office-us-state-legislatures-are-poised-change <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">As More Women Run for Office, U.S. State Legislatures are Poised to Change</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Getty.Huffington%20Post.jpeg?h=13329584&amp;itok=Gy0Wr8I0" width="1280" height="720" alt="Women running for office" title="Photo Credit: Getty/Huffington Post" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="WASHINGTON (Reuters) - As women line up to run for U.S. political office at historic rates, state legislatures - where some of America’s most critical policy decisions get made - could see a slew of new female lawmakers after November’s vote, according to a Reuters analysis of election data. In Michigan, for example, a state that proved pivotal in electing President Donald Trump in 2016, only 23 percent of state lawmakers are women. But this year, a woman will appear on the Michigan ballot for governor, attorney general, secretary of state and in 63 percent of the state’s Senate seats and 71 percent of its House seats. Nationally, if women candidates are as successful as they have been for the past two decades - their historic rate of victory is about 60 percent - the number of women in state legislatures could reach an all-time high of about 40 percent, according to an analysis by Reuters of state ballots and historic campaigns... To read the full article by Ginger Gibson, visit Reuters. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "The large influx of women seeking public office this year could produce the largest increase of women state lawmakers. If women candidates win this year at their historic rate of 60 percent, they could account for about 38 percent of state lawmakers. By: Ginger Gibson " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>WASHINGTON (Reuters) - As women line up to run for U.S. political office at historic rates, state legislatures - where some of America’s most critical policy decisions get made - could see a slew of new female lawmakers after November’s vote, according to a Reuters analysis of election data.</p> <p>In Michigan, for example, a state that proved pivotal in electing President Donald Trump in 2016, only 23 percent of state lawmakers are women. But this year, a woman will appear on the Michigan ballot for governor, attorney general, secretary of state and in 63 percent of the state’s Senate seats and 71 percent of its House seats.</p> <p>Nationally, if women candidates are as successful as they have been for the past two decades - their historic rate of victory is about 60 percent - the number of women in state legislatures could reach an all-time high of about 40 percent, according to an <a href="https://tmsnrt.rs/2nBH90x">analysis by Reuters</a> of state ballots and historic campaigns...</p> <p><em>To read the full article by Ginger Gibson, visit <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-election-women/as-more-women-run-for-office-u-s-state-legislatures-are-poised-to-change-idUSKBN1L00Z8">Reuters.</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/society-arts-culture" hreflang="en">Society, Arts &amp; Culture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/elections" hreflang="en">Elections</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/metoo" hreflang="en">#MeToo</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 08:44:10 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 616 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu New Poll Shows That Republicans Have Become the Party of #MeToo Backlash https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/news/new-poll-shows-republicans-have-become-party-metoo-backlash <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New Poll Shows That Republicans Have Become the Party of #MeToo Backlash</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Kavanaugh.jpg?h=b13c6f5e&amp;itok=fSWBjBzI" width="1280" height="720" alt="Kavanaugh" title="Photo Credit: Andrew Harnik / Pool via AFP - Getty Images" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="A new poll is the latest evidence of a dramatic partisan breakdown over what to do about sexual assault allegations: A majority of Republicans are willing to support political candidates who face multiple accusations of sexual assault, while a vast majority of Democrats are not. The poll, released on Wednesday morning by the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute, asked a representative sample of Americans this question: “If a political candidate has been accused of sexual assault by multiple people, would you still consider voting for them if you agreed with them on the issues, or would you definitely not vote for them?” Fifty-six percent of Republicans said they would consider voting for a candidate who had been accused by multiple people; only 34 percent said they would not. By contrast, 81 percent of Democrats said they would not vote for such a candidate, and only 16 percent said they’d consider it: To read the full article by Zack Beauchamp, visit Vox.com "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "A new poll is the latest evidence of a dramatic partisan breakdown over what to do about sexual assault allegations: A majority of Republicans are willing to support political candidates who face multiple accusations of sexual assault, while a vast majority of Democrats are not. By: Zack Beauchamp " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A new poll is the latest evidence of a dramatic partisan breakdown over what to do about sexual assault allegations: A majority of Republicans are willing to support political candidates who face multiple accusations of sexual assault, while a vast majority of Democrats are not.</p> <p>The poll, released on Wednesday morning by the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute, asked a representative sample of Americans this question: “If a political candidate has been accused of sexual assault by multiple people, would you still consider voting for them if you agreed with them on the issues, or would you definitely not vote for them?”</p> <p>Fifty-six percent of Republicans said they would consider voting for a candidate who had been accused by multiple people; only 34 percent said they would not. By contrast, 81 percent of Democrats said they would <em>not</em> vote for such a candidate, and only 16 percent said they’d consider it:</p> <p><em>To read the full article by Zack Beauchamp, visit <a href="https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/10/3/17932324/brett-kavanaugh-news-republicans-poll-sexual-assault">Vox.com</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/women-stem" hreflang="en">Women in STEM</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/kavanaugh" hreflang="en">Kavanaugh</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/metoo" hreflang="en">#MeToo</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sexual-assault" hreflang="en">Sexual Assault</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 08:32:57 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 611 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu Kavanaugh Battle Shows the Power, and the Limits, of #MeToo Movement https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/news/kavanaugh-battle-shows-power-and-limits-metoo-movement <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Kavanaugh Battle Shows the Power, and the Limits, of #MeToo Movement</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/CBF.jpg?h=199d8c1f&amp;itok=k93s1TNm" width="1280" height="720" alt="Hearings" title="Photo Credit: Gabriella Demczuk" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="One of the first stories Gretchen Carlson covered in her career as a television journalist was the 1991 Senate hearing where Anita Hill sat alone at the witness table and testified that Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her. Then, Ms. Carlson said, “I was promptly harassed on the job.” But it wasn’t for another 25 years that she would file her explosive sexual harassment lawsuit against Roger Ailes, the powerful founding chairman of Fox News. Ms. Carlson, too, was largely alone; it was July 2016, more than a year before the #MeToo movement would erupt, and even some female colleagues at her own network questioned her actions. While she won a $20 million settlement, Mr. Ailes left the network with a $40 million payout. As she watched this week as another Supreme Court nominee faced sexual assault allegations — this time from a woman supported by sexual assault survivors and female senators sitting behind her — Ms. Carlson could not help seeing the effects of the revolution she helped start, and its limits... To read the full article by Kate Zernike and Emily Steel, visit The New York Times. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Institutions have been slow to change. But women who have brought charges of sexual misconduct say that as more women come forward, they inevitably will. By: Kate Zernike and Emily Steel " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>One of the first stories Gretchen Carlson covered in her career as a television journalist was the 1991 Senate hearing where Anita Hill sat alone at the witness table and testified that Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her. Then, Ms. Carlson said, “I was promptly harassed on the job.”</p> <p>But it wasn’t for another 25 years that she would file her <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/07/06/business/media/document-Carlson-Complaint-Filed.html?module=inline">explosive sexual harassment lawsuit</a> against Roger Ailes, the powerful founding chairman of Fox News. Ms. Carlson, too, was largely alone; it was July 2016, more than a year before the #MeToo movement would erupt, and even some female colleagues at her own network <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/09/08/business/media/gretchen-carlson-lawsuit-roger-ailes-defenders.html?module=inline">questioned</a> her actions. While she won a $20 million settlement, Mr. Ailes <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/22/business/media/roger-ailes-fox-news.html?module=inline">left the network with a $40 million payout</a>.</p> <p>As she watched this week as another Supreme Court nominee faced sexual assault allegations — this time from a woman supported by sexual assault survivors and female senators sitting behind her — Ms. Carlson could not help seeing the effects of the revolution she helped start, and its limits...</p> <p><em>To read the full article by Kate Zernike and Emily Steel, visit <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/29/us/politics/kavanaugh-blasey-metoo-supreme-court.html">The New York Times.</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/society-arts-culture" hreflang="en">Society, Arts &amp; Culture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/metoo" hreflang="en">#MeToo</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/kavanaugh" hreflang="en">Kavanaugh</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sexual-assault" hreflang="en">Sexual Assault</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 08:23:48 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 606 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu Truth and Consequences: American Politics After a Year of #MeToo https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/news/truth-and-consequences-american-politics-after-year-metoo <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Truth and Consequences: American Politics After a Year of #MeToo</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Economist%20Protest.jpg?h=7a6e80fd&amp;itok=ATrLxAT_" width="1280" height="720" alt="#MeToo" title="photo credit: The Economist" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="“THE political nightmare that has faced my colleague,” said Mark Hatfield on September 7th 1995, “is coming to an end.” The colleague was Bob Packwood, his fellow senator from Oregon, who was resigning. The “nightmare” was a Senate Ethics Committee investigation that found Mr Packwood had been sexually harassing subordinates since the 1960s. Mr Packwood battled the committee for three years, destroying evidence and appearing “perplexed or confused…about what actually constituted sexual harassment”. When he resigned, he won praise from senator after senator—not one of whom managed a single word of concern for his many victims. In one sense, times have changed. Over the past year—ever since the #MeToo hashtag went viral in the wake of gruesome allegations of sexual assault levelled against Harvey Weinstein, a film producer—nine members of Congress have resigned or declined to run for re-election after facing credible charges of sexual misconduct. Two White House officials left after being accused of spousal abuse (they deny the charges) and three congressional candidates lost or quit their campaigns.But that change is unevenly distributed across the political spectrum... To read the full article, visit The Economist. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "The defining movement of the Trump era is turbocharging existing trends. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>“THE political nightmare that has faced my colleague,” said Mark Hatfield on September 7th 1995, “is coming to an end.” The colleague was Bob Packwood, his fellow senator from Oregon, who was resigning. The “nightmare” was a Senate Ethics Committee investigation that found Mr Packwood had been sexually harassing subordinates since the 1960s. Mr Packwood battled the committee for three years, destroying evidence and appearing “perplexed or confused…about what actually constituted sexual harassment”. When he resigned, he won praise from senator after senator—not one of whom managed a single word of concern for his many victims.</p> <p>In one sense, times have changed. Over the past year—ever since the #MeToo hashtag went viral in the wake of gruesome allegations of sexual assault levelled against Harvey Weinstein, a film producer—nine members of Congress have resigned or declined to run for re-election after facing credible charges of sexual misconduct. Two White House officials left after being accused of spousal abuse (they deny the charges) and three congressional candidates lost or quit their campaigns.But that change is unevenly distributed across the political spectrum...</p> <p><em>To read the full article, visit <a href="https://www.economist.com/united-states/2018/09/27/american-politics-after-a-year-of-metoo">The Economist.</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/society-arts-culture" hreflang="en">Society, Arts &amp; Culture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/metoo" hreflang="en">#MeToo</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sexual-assault" hreflang="en">Sexual Assault</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/gender" hreflang="en">gender</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 08:18:19 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 601 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu Why is Trump Off the Hook in MeToo Movement? Because We Let Him Off https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/news/why-trump-hook-metoo-movement-because-we-let-him <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Why is Trump Off the Hook in MeToo Movement? Because We Let Him Off</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/DJT.jpg?h=4c1fc98e&amp;itok=nrJx0Vgp" width="1280" height="720" alt="DJT" title="Photo Credit: Evan Vucci/The Associated Press" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="In the now daily roll call of sexual-harassment reckonings for men in Hollywood, media, academia and politics, one is conspicuously missing. It’s the No. 1 question I’ve been hearing of late from Seattle readers. It’s great, they say, that we’re finally having it out about some men’s mistreatment of women. But what about the man at the very top? “The MeToo movement is generations overdue, and I know the important thing is that it leads to lasting change,” one Seattle woman wrote to me. “So I shouldn’t get partisan with it. But … why the hell is Trump the only one who is immune?” Great question! More than a dozen women came forward last year alleging Donald Trump had in some way physically violated them, and one of the women retains an active civil suit against him (all the other claims were beyond the statute of limitations)... To read the full article by Danny Westneat, visit The Seattle Times. "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Think of a political campaign as a trial, with the election as the verdict. The reason President Donald Trump is seemingly immune from the sexual-harassment cultural shift is because, like it or not, voters already found him not guilty. Or at least not guilty enough. By: Danny Westneat " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In the now daily roll call of sexual-harassment reckonings for men in Hollywood, media, academia and politics, one is conspicuously missing.</p> <p>It’s the No. 1 question I’ve been hearing of late from Seattle readers. It’s great, they say, that we’re finally having it out about some men’s mistreatment of women. But what about the man at the very top?</p> <p>“The MeToo movement is generations overdue, and I know the important thing is that it leads to lasting change,” one Seattle woman wrote to me. “So I shouldn’t get partisan with it. But … why the hell is Trump the only one who is immune?”</p> <p>Great question! <a href="https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/trump-and-the-truth-the-sexual-assault-allegations">More than a dozen women</a> came forward last year alleging Donald Trump had in some way physically violated them, and one of the women retains an active civil suit against him (all the other claims were beyond the statute of limitations)...</p> <p><em>To read the full article by Danny Westneat, visit <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/why-is-trump-off-the-hook-in-metoo-movement-because-we-let-him-off/">The Seattle Times.</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/society-arts-culture" hreflang="en">Society, Arts &amp; Culture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/metoo" hreflang="en">#MeToo</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/gender" hreflang="en">gender</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sexual-assault" hreflang="en">Sexual Assault</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 08:10:28 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 596 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu The Political Impact of #MeToo https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/news/political-impact-metoo <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The Political Impact of #MeToo</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 08, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/Medium%20MeToo.jpeg?h=de17517d&amp;itok=MR_m3pnb" width="1280" height="720" alt="#MeToo" title="Photo Credit: REX/Shutterstock" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="Whether it’s politicians, entertainment moguls, or sports coaches, no industry is immune to the perils of sexual harassment. High profile men, such as entertainment magnate Harvey Weinstein, RNC Finance Chair Steve Wynn, and White House Aide Rob Porter, have lost their jobs due to sexual assault and abuse allegations. The #MeToo movement has encouraged a wave of women to share their sexual harassment experiences and confront men who have behaved inappropriately. The media has been filled with coverage, including Larry Nasser’s trial, and the Hollywood award shows have been public platforms for the biggest celebrities to call for change. Consequently, men in power are being forced to step down from their positions. According to one study, at least 40 lawmakers across 20 states have been accused of sexual misconduct or harassment. In our recent national survey of 1,000 adults, we asked how people are feeling about the handling of sexual harassment and domestic abuse allegations. Interestingly, but maybe not surprisingly, there is no apparent consensus among Americans when it comes to whether these allegations and the consequential firings are a step in the right direction for women’s rights or if the allegations are ruining lives without giving the proper due process. Indeed, 45% of Americans believe the resignations and legal actions in response to the movement show significant progress in women’s rights, 35% believe the allegations are being handled as guilty verdicts without the accused being given the right of due process, and 20% are unsure... To read the full article by Stefan Hankin, visit Medium.com "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "The impact of the #MeToo movement in policits. By: Stefan Hankin " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Whether it’s politicians, entertainment moguls, or sports coaches, no industry is immune to the perils of sexual harassment. High profile men, such as entertainment magnate <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/people/2017/10/27/weinstein-scandal-complete-list-accusers/804663001/">Harvey Weinstein</a>, RNC Finance Chair <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/06/business/steve-wynn-resigns.html">Steve Wynn</a>, and White House Aide <a href="https://www.politico.com/story/2018/02/07/white-house-aide-rob-porter-resigns-after-allegations-from-ex-wives-397407">Rob Porter</a>, have lost their jobs due to sexual assault and abuse allegations. The <a href="http://time.com/time-person-of-the-year-2017-silence-breakers/">#MeToo movement</a> has encouraged a wave of women to share their sexual harassment experiences and confront men who have behaved inappropriately. The media has been filled with coverage, including Larry Nasser’s trial, and the Hollywood award shows have been public platforms for the biggest celebrities to call for change. Consequently, men in power are being forced to step down from their positions. According to one <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/11/20/sexual-harassment-statehouses/882874001/">study</a>, at least 40 lawmakers across 20 states have been accused of sexual misconduct or harassment.</p> <p>In our recent national survey of 1,000 adults, we asked how people are feeling about the handling of sexual harassment and domestic abuse allegations. Interestingly, but maybe not surprisingly, there is no apparent consensus among Americans when it comes to whether these allegations and the consequential firings are a step in the right direction for women’s rights or if the allegations are ruining lives without giving the proper due process. Indeed, 45% of Americans believe the resignations and legal actions in response to the movement show significant progress in women’s rights, 35% believe the allegations are being handled as guilty verdicts without the accused being given the right of due process, and 20% are unsure...</p> <p><em>To read the full article by Stefan Hankin, visit <a href="https://medium.com/@stefan_30846/the-political-impact-of-metoo-e5c9ff20a779">Medium.com</a></em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/society-arts-culture" hreflang="en">Society, Arts &amp; Culture</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/politics" hreflang="en">Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/metoo" hreflang="en">#MeToo</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sexual-assault" hreflang="en">Sexual Assault</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women" hreflang="en">Women</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/gender" hreflang="en">gender</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Oct 2018 07:54:14 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 591 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu Lessons Learned Working with Women in STEM https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/blog/lessons-learned <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Lessons Learned Working with Women in STEM</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/2191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" content="Women In STEM Editorial Board">Women In STEM Editorial Board</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 01, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk2991/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/telescope_0.jpg?h=3873714b&amp;itok=iMjmnkzD" width="1280" height="720" alt="telescope" title="Photo Credit: Can Stock Photo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description=" By Kate Blumenthal   I stood outside craning my neck to stare at the moon. I was in third grade and completing an assignment, where my classmates and I documented through drawings the phases of the moon over the course of a month. I enjoyed it so much, I wrote a letter to NASA and received a package in response including pictures of the moon and other planets.  I loved science. I was curious about the world and wanted to understand how it worked. Then I hit high school and science started to become math heavy. Math didn’t come naturally to me like liberal arts subjects. I was constantly frustrated. Adults and family members directed me to instead shift my attention to subjects that came more easily. “Mommy isn’t good at math either. It is okay, math is hard for girls. You’re great at other subjects. Focus on those and do your best.” And just like that, any interest and excitement I felt towards science was extinguished. Fast forward to present day, where in my work at the UC Davis ADVANCE program I am surrounded by intelligent, hard-working, successful women in the STEM fields, these memories of loving science have come flooding back. Girls don’t need help becoming interested in science. They already are. Girls need help STAYING interested in science.  4 lessons I’ve learned working with women in STEM: You can be interested and pursue things that do not come naturally So often we are steered in the direction of things that come easily to us – whether a subject in school or hobby. The women I have met each have at least one story of obstacles they had to overcome to pursue their interest in STEM, whether as a student or as a professional navigating their way through a male dominated field. There are women scientists, technology professionals, engineers, and mathematicians As a child, I did not have female science teachers or learn about female scientists. This further instilled the idea that science is for boys. It contributed to me shifting attention to other subject areas and stopped me from trying hard or taking more than the required classes I needed to graduate. A female presence in this area would have made a world of difference. The women that have persevered and continue to pursue STEM are role models that are sorely needed for young girls today. There are no boy subjects and girl subjects This old misconception of “boy subjects” and “girl subjects” succeeds in shutting women out from STEM fields at an early age, and contributes to math anxiety and lower confidence in their skills. The Scientific American has a great analysis of this. Science is for girls. History is for girls. Reading and writing is for girls. Math is for girls. Building stuff is for girls. Community outreach efforts to increase visibility of women in STEM are crucial to challenging the climate and stereotypes that have previously dominated the conversation. It’s never too late This is for all the women that grew up like me – interested but conditioned to think it is not for us. At 30 years old, I am now surrounded by women that prove STEM is for girls. It is not only okay, but AWESOME to become interested and keep learning. Thank you to all the women in STEM who continue to encourage and support other women around them to learn and grow.   -------------- The Blog has an Editorial Board responsible for the quality of information and content development.   "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "4 lessons learned working with women in STEM. By: Kate Blumenthal " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h4><span><span> By Kate Blumenthal</span></span></h4> <p> </p> <p><span><span>I stood outside craning my neck to stare at the moon. I was in third grade and completing an assignment, where my classmates and I documented through drawings the phases of the moon over the course of a month. I enjoyed it so much, I wrote a letter to NASA and received a package in response including pictures of the moon and other planets. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>I loved science. I was curious about the world and wanted to understand how it worked. Then I hit high school and science started to become math heavy. Math didn’t come naturally to me like liberal arts subjects. I was constantly frustrated. Adults and family members directed me to instead shift my attention to subjects that came more easily. “Mommy isn’t good at math either. It is okay, math is hard for girls. You’re great at other subjects. Focus on those and do your best.”</span></span></p> <p><span><span>And just like that, any interest and excitement I felt towards science was extinguished. Fast forward to present day, where in my work at the <span><span><a href="http://ucd-advance.ucdavis.edu/">UC Davis ADVANCE</a></span></span> program I am surrounded by intelligent, hard-working, successful women in the STEM fields, these memories of loving science have come flooding back. Girls don’t need help becoming interested in science. They already are. Girls need help <em>STAYING</em> interested in science. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>4 lessons I’ve learned working with women in STEM:</span></span></p> <ol><li><span><span><strong>You can be interested and pursue things that do not come naturally</strong></span></span></li> </ol><p><span><span>So often we are steered in the direction of things that come easily to us – whether a subject in school or hobby. The women I have met each have at least one story of obstacles they had to overcome to pursue their interest in STEM, whether as a student or as a professional navigating their way through a male dominated field. </span></span></p> <ol start="2"><li><span><span><strong>There are women scientists, technology professionals, engineers, and mathematicians </strong></span></span></li> </ol><p><span><span>As a child, I did not have female science teachers or learn about female scientists. This further instilled the idea that science is for boys. It contributed to me shifting attention to other subject areas and stopped me from trying hard or taking more than the required classes I needed to graduate. A female presence in this area would have made a world of difference. The women that have persevered and continue to pursue STEM are role models that are sorely needed for young girls today.</span></span></p> <ol start="3"><li><span><span><strong>There are no boy subjects and girl subjects</strong></span></span></li> </ol><p><span><span>This old misconception of “boy subjects” and “girl subjects” succeeds in shutting women out from STEM fields at an early age, and contributes to <span><span><a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/2332858416673617">math anxiety</a></span></span> and lower <span><span><a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/buy/2009-24669-002">confidence</a></span></span> in their skills. <span><span><a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/are-boys-better-than-girls-at-math/">The Scientific American</a></span></span> has a great analysis of this. Science is for girls. History is for girls. Reading and writing is for girls. Math is for girls. Building stuff is for girls. Community outreach efforts to increase visibility of women in STEM are crucial to challenging the climate and stereotypes that have previously dominated the conversation.</span></span></p> <ol start="4"><li><span><span><strong>It’s never too late</strong></span></span></li> </ol><p><span><span>This is for all the women that grew up like me – interested but conditioned to think it is not for us. At 30 years old, I am now surrounded by women that prove STEM <em>is</em> for girls. It is not only okay, but <em>AWESOME</em> to become interested and keep learning. Thank you to all the women in STEM who continue to encourage and support other women around them to learn and grow. </span></span></p> <p> </p> <p>--------------</p> <p>The Blog has an Editorial Board responsible for the quality of information and content development.</p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/women-stem" hreflang="en">Women in STEM</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/women-stem" hreflang="en">women in STEM</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/gender-equity" hreflang="en">Gender Equity</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/gender-bias" hreflang="en">Gender Bias</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 01 Oct 2018 21:33:24 +0000 Women In STEM Editorial Board 586 at https://womeninstem.ucdavis.edu